The Sparks Brothers

So, I’ve seen the new Edgar Wright film, have you? No, I’m not talking “Last Night in Soho”, that comes out in October and it looks to be scary fun. This film is a documentary about the eccentric band “Sparks” and the two brothers that are the heart and soul of musical integrity. Someone once said that rock and roll and comedy don’t really mix well, but that person had never heard Sparks, or maybe that’s why they never heard them because their offbeat sense of humor keeps the pop market from fully embracing their music.¬†

This was a father’s Day activity for me. My daughter, who barely had any inkling of this band, found the subject  delightful and fascinating. I was slightly better off than her in approaching this, I knew of Sparks during their second phase, and I enjoyed their music, owned a couple of albums and even went to see them once live at the same amusement park that they filmed a movie appearance in. I was a casual fan, who lost track of them, and now I wish I was the kind of person who had all of their albums and had been following them for fifty years. 

Well there is an abundance of Talking Heads in the documentary [the interview style not the band], there are also performance clips, news footage, chat show appearances, and intriguing music videos to bring us all up to speed. Ron and Russell Mael are not British, though many might think so since much of their breakthrough work was first successful in the United Kingdom. They are in fact Southern California boys who unfortunately went to UCLA, but do not seem to have been permanently harmed by that experience. The older brother Ron, is the Principle songwriter and keyboardist for the band and his younger brother is the lead singer/frontman of the band. They have had various other musicians, in and out of the band over a fifty year time span, and many of them appear in this film as do a legion of their admirers. 

In movies, there are several uses of “Sparks” music. One of my late wife’s favorite films was the 1983 film “Valley Girl” and there were two Sparks songs on that soundtrack, “Eaten By The Monster of Love” and “Angst in My Pants“. My favorite film of 2010 was “Kick Ass” and it features a moment with their first big hit “This Town Ain’t Big Enough for the Both of Us“. In the documentary, there is a discussion of the era of KROQ radio station in Los Angeles and how influential it was in getting New Wave acts played on the air, Sparks, while not a New Wave band per se did get covered on that station. In the years 1980 to 1983, my radio was always on that station number and that’s how I heard about Sparks appearance at Magic Mountain for a Halloween show. The band made a brief musical moment in the movie “Rollercoaster”  in 1977 at the same park, but in the Halloween show, they played the same stage where the Puppet show headlined and “Spinal Tap” got second billing. It’s also the stage featured in “Kiss Meets the Phantom of the Park”, and coincidentally, my Father played that stage in 1971 right after the park had opened, I worked with him for two weeks at the holiday period. 

The band is prolific and continues to be eccentric. This film was two hours and fifteen minutes, and we saw it at an Alamo Drafthouse with a thirty minute lead in hosted by director Edgar Wright, so the whole experience was even longer. It still felt short, especially in comparison to “In the Heights” which we had jus seen a couple of days earlier. If you are a fan of the band and their music, you really should get out to a theater to see this. If you are not a fan, you should go see it and become one. 

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