The Nice Guys

Here is a film with no redeeming social value whatever, except that it will tickle your funny bone, startle you with sudden shock and leave you feeling invigorated afterwards. The film is a hoot and if there is anyone still living in America with a sense of humor, this film was made for you. While it it not politically incorrect in any way, it features characters that are so amusingly not hip, that the irony police might be called out. “The Nice Guys” is vulgar but not cynical. There is plenty of violence played for humor, but there are real reactions to most of those moments which let the film be much friendlier than you have any right to hope for.

The movie has a retro feel because it is set in the 1970s but also because the characters will remind you of a dozen TV show detectives you may have watched in that era. Jim Rockford is one step away from being a partner in this detective agency, but that would turn the film into a takeoff of the three stooges rather than an homage to Abbot and Costello. Ryan Gosling plays Holland March, the boozy private eye, as if he were a handsome Lou Costello. He has the double takes and flustered line delivery that would fit perfectly in a comedy place filler from 1948, “Abbot and Costello Meet the Bimbo”. He even has a moment where upon discovering a corpse he becomes a dysphagiatic  mute.

Russell Crowe has settled into middle aged beefiness with as much grace as a guy can muster. He’s not the matinee idol of twenty years ago, but he is still a hell of a good actor and he puts on some great comic chops here. Crowe and Gosling play off of one another in such a natural way that it is easy to imagine a series of films  featuring these characters. Of course I thought the same thing eleven years ago with Robert Downey Jr. and Val Kilmer in pretty much the same roles. Shane Black may be cribbing from himself but at least he’s doing it from “Kiss, Kiss, Bang, Bang” and not “The Last Boy Scout”. The convoluted plot and the violent gangsters are standard for him, as is the involvement of a woman, more competent that the two leads, in this case March’s thirteen year old daughter Holly, played by Angourie Rice.

The Warner Brothers logo from the seventies is on the opening credits of the movie. The city of Los Angeles is in it’s deep dark days of heavy smog overcast, and Hollywood was a sleaze factory of sex more than violence. Southern California residents will recognize the decay of the Hollywood sign, the Los Angeles River Bridge, and the intersection of Jefferson and Figueroa are not anything like they once were. [In fact, the bridge is gone now]. The hillsides of Hollywood though are played for great laughs and Ryan Gosling may be a comic genius because he manages to make the most incompetent Private Eye in the world, still come off as a sometimes insightful investigator, of course sometimes he just gets lucky.

I hope they do make this into an adult cartoon, ala “Archer” or at least plan a couple of other big screen adventures. It would be a shame to leave this much enjoyment to just the current movie season. This is my most anticipated movie of the summer, and The Temptations “Papa was a Rolling Stone” had me hooked from the first few frames. Plenty of soul music from the era plus a Bee Gees tune and Kiss anthem. It’s as if they found one of the home made 8-track mix tapes from my old Cutlass and plugged it into the speakers for the film. Maybe it’s the nostalgia factor that worked for me but I believe others much younger than me will get a kick out of this as well, burnt orange palate aside.

 

 

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2 thoughts on “The Nice Guys

  1. Loved this! A number of wonderful references in the film that really brought that decade back to me. Especially those radio smog-alerts and that rear view of the then decrepit Hollywood sign! As I been mentioning since leaving the movie theater, I do have to note one glaring historical goof: [SPOILER ALERT] for the shoot-out at the March residence, when Holland shouts to Holly to call 9-1-1. [big screech] Emergency 9-1-1 service was first implemented in the City of Los Angeles on October 1, 1984, and was not operational in ’77. Most won’t pick up on it, though, ‘cept nice guys like you and me. 😉

    Great look at this, Richard (and I may head back to see it again this weekend)

    p.s., since you mentioned the soundtrack, the other mild musical slip-up was including Rupert Holmes’ Escape (Pina Colada Song), which was released in ’79, for this 1977 tale.

  2. I noticed the 911 anachronism, but I missed the Pina Colada mistake. Probably distracted by by trying to remember what was across the street from the Comedy Store before the House of Blues.

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